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Both of these keynote talks are introductions to the concepts in Teaching Naked and both build a case for why we need to embrace new technologies and methods. The workshops focus more on the how.  Keynote #1 is designed more for faculty and includes more specific examples of easy technologies that can be used immediately to enhance student learning. Keynote #2 addresses more administrative and strategic concerns.

Keynote 1 (for Faculty)    (60-90m)

Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology out of your College Classroom will Improve Student Learning

Technology is changing higher education, but the greatest value of a physical university will remain its face-to-face (naked) interaction between faculty and students. The most important benefits to using technology occur outside of the classroom. New technology can increase student preparation and engagement between classes and create more time for the in-class dialogue that makes the campus experience worth the extra money it will always cost to deliver. Students already use online content, but need better ways to interact with material before every class by taking online quizzes, doing interactive online assignments, playing games, asking questions or working in online communities. By rethinking our assignments, use of technology and course design, we can create more class time for the activities and interactions that most spark the critical thinking and change of mental models we seek.

Keynote 2 (for Chairs and Administrators) (60-90m)

Teaching Naked: Campus Value and Changing Minds

Technology is changing higher education, but the greatest value of a physical university will remain its face-to-face (naked) interaction between faculty and students. Technology can allow us to leverage the benefit of classroom interaction, if we use it to increase student preparation and engagement between classes and create more time for in-class dialogue. All of our campuses are now hybrid learning environments. The liberal arts mission has never been more important, but it is inhibited by a department and curricular structure that is designed primarily to support specialized research. Technology will increasingly be better at delivering facts and content, but classrooms are still better at changing minds. To make the campus experience worth the extra money it will always cost to deliver, we need a stronger focus on the nature of our product and more integration and alignment of values and mission.

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